Revolutionary – John Hanna

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This is the first post in my Revolutionary series.  Each month, I’ll be highlighting different ancestors who either fought in the war or helped the cause.  It’s amazing when you start hearing all the different stories.  There are men, women, and even young adults who helped to make the United States exactly that, united.

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Today’s profile is John Hanna.  John is my 6th Great-Grandfather on my paternal side.  He was born in 1756 on his way to America from Ireland.  His parents, James A and Anne Johnson Hanna had six other children; Elizabeth, James W, William, David, Joseph, and Martha.  Once the family arrived, the settled in the Virginia colony.

John enlisted in the Continental Army in Greenbrier County, Virginia in 1777.  He joined as a private under Captains Samuel Lapsley and Alexander Breckenridge.  He saw quite a few battles including the Siege of Charleston (South Carolina) and the Battle of Monmouth.  If you’re a Hamilton fan, I’m sure you’re familiar with the Battle of Monmouth.  I’m looking at you, Charles Lee.

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At the Siege of Charleston, John was taken by the British Army as a prisoner of war.  He was held captive for about eighteen months.  Unfortunately, there are no records of where John was held or what the conditions were.  It seems that after his release, John was discharged from the Army.

After the war, John settled in Augusta County, West Virginia.  While living there, he met and married Jane Graham.  Jane and her family were also from Ireland.  If history teaches us anything, it seems more than likely that their families were from the same area of Ireland.  They married in 1787 and together had seven children; John, Robert Graham, Jane, Christopher, Joseph, Elizabeth, and Martha.

John and Jane eventually moved their family to Jackson County, Ohio.  The children would scatter to different states after that.  You have to think that John was proud of this fact.  He had fought for this country and the right for his children to explore it.  John Hanna passed away on April 11, 1845 at the age of 89.  I think it’s safe to say that John lived a long and eventful life!

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