Posted in Weekend Update

Weekend Updated – January 11

This week I’ve been trying to gather more pictures.  I love the Genealogy Photo-A-Day challenge (shout out to Genealogy Girl Talks!) and I try my best to cover all sides, and lines, of my family.  I’m always looking for that one picture that will hopefully spark a family history conversation.

As I was looking and searching for pictures, I found myself on the edge of a rabbit hole.  You know what I mean….when you’re trying to focus on one research item and then find something that takes you off on a whole other tangent. That’s what happened with me and the Callaghan family.

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I found the Callaghan family when researching my paternal Hanna line.  My 6th great aunt, Martha Hanna, married a man named William O. H. Callaghan.  I have done some research on them, but basically just names, dates, and locations.  I found a picture of one of their daughters, Jane, and the fall into the rabbit hole began.  I found more pictures and more stories than I knew what to do with!  I’m so excited to share these with you down the road.

I would love to say that I’m sitting here, watching the Kentucky basketball game and no longer living in the rabbit hole, but that would be a lie.  I’m really enjoying getting to know my Callaghan family!

What are you working on this weekend?

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Posted in Ancestor Stories

Fresh Start

I debated a bit on what to write when I saw the topic of “fresh start” as part of the #52Ancestor Challenge.  Was it too on the nose to write about the new year?  Should I find an ancestor who had a great story about starting new?  There were so many directions I could go and so much overthinking on which one to choose.

I decided to go in a bit of a different direction.  I mean, isn’t that what a fresh start is all about?  In my opinion, a fresh start is all about finally doing those things that you’ve been putting on the back burner.  It’s about finally tackling those things that you’ve wanted to do, but just haven’t found the time to actually do them.  It’s about working towards accomplishing what has been sitting on your wish list.

So, that’s what I’m doing.  I’m taking a fresh start on my genealogy wish list.  More specifically, I am going after what I have wanted “The Cool Girl’s Guide to Genealogy” to be over the past couple of years.  I’ve had big dreams for this blog and for my genealogy services, but there’s this pesky thing called life that keeps getting in the way.

I talk about some of this in my January newsletter, but I wanted to write more in depth about it here.  I want this place to be a genealogy community.  I don’t want it to be a “I talk and you listen” place.  I want to take you on my journey of finding my ancestors, hitting frustrating brick walls, and (hopefully) finally finishing my certification.

I want to help you along your genealogy path.  If you have questions, I want to be able to either give you an answer or find the answer together.  I want to talk about the things that you want to know.  If you’re a beginner, I want to be able to help you with direction.  If you’ve been doing this for years, I want to share in your stories of triumph and failure.

I also want to celebrate the voices of other genealogist and those in this field.  If you have an area of expertise, I want to give you a platform. Yes, we may be competitors as far as our genealogy services, but I feel like there is enough room for all of us.  We all have different areas that we research and different experiences in our genealogy endeavors.  It would be a shame not to share all that information!

I would love to hear more about your genealogy goals for 2020.  Post in the comments below and let’s all cheer each other on as we make a fresh start!

Posted in Weekend Update

Weekend Update

I realized this morning that is has been way too long since I gave a weekend update.  So, I thought I change that!  Here’s an update of what I am currently working on.

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Earlier this week, I received a message from a very distant cousin.  My grandmother matched her on DNA and she was writing to find our connection.  She gave me the surname of Boling/Bowling.  I quickly did a search through my tree and only found one ancestor by that last name, Mary Molly Bowling.

Molly, as she was called, married my 8th Great Grandfather, Andrew Baker.  I was hesitant to say this was the correct connection, however the places where her ancestor lived and mine did match.  The only problem with proving this connection was that her connection was born in the mid 1800s where my only Bowling ancestor lived in the 1600s.  That was quite the time gap!

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So, what do I do now?  How do I ever make this connection?  My plan is to work back to come forward.  To start, I expanded Molly’s family.  I only had her parents and no siblings listed in my tree.  If I was ever going to find the connection, I had to first find her siblings.  While there is no guarantee that the connection doesn’t start further back, this was the best place for me to start.

Today, I am working on moving this line forward.  This connection issue is just another reason why it is important to include siblings in your research.  It is so easy to get wrapped up in only following your direct line, but many questions/connections can be answered when you expand your tree!  I’ll keep everyone update on the details of when I finally figure all this out!

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Posted in Baking With My Ancestors

Baking With My Ancestors – Coca Cola Cake

When I was deciding on what to bake this month, I knew it had to be something from my Grandmother.  June is her birthday month (June 16, to be exact) and it seemed only fitting to bake from a recipe that she has passed down to me. I choose Coca Cola cake not only because of the hand-written recipe, but also because it’s traditionally southern, much like my Grandmother.

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Nobody knows exactly where Coca Cola cake originated.  Some say it was by a housewife looking for a new spin on a chocolate cake.  Others say it was created by Coca Cola themselves as a clever way to market their drink in other ways.  The only thing everyone can agree on is that it was invented in the South.  The Coca Cola Company’s headquarters are, after all, located in Atlanta, Georgia.

Coca Cola cake it not made like a traditional cake.  If you find it a bit lumpy at moments, that’s okay!  Also, when you are finished with the batter, it may appear a bit runny.  That’s okay too!  While this cake may have some unusual steps, it’s tough to mess it up.  That’s the best thing about this recipe…even the mistakes taste yummy!

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A note before you get started, the frosting will be applied to the cake while both the cake and frosting are still warm!

Ingredients (batter)

  • 2 cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 3 tablespoons cocoa
  • 1 cup Coca Cola
  • 1 cup Butter (2 sticks)
  • 1 1/2 cups Marshmallows (I used mini marshmallows)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup Buttermilk
  • 1 teaspoon Baking Soda
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla

How to make the Batter

  1. Grease and flour 9×13 inch cake pan and set aside
  2. Preheat oven to 350F
  3. In a large bowl, combine flour and sugar. Stir to combine.
  4. In a saucepan, combine cocoa, Coca Cola, butter, and marshmallows and bring to a boil.
  5. Combine the boiled mixture with the flour/sugar mixture and set aside.
  6. In a separate bowl, mix eggs, buttermilk, baking soda, and vanilla.  Add to the mixture in the large bowl.
  7. Pour mix into the prepared pan and bake for about 35 to 40 minutes.
  8. Cake will be ready when a toothpick comes out clean.

Ingredients (frosting)

  • 1/2 cup Butter (1 stick)
  • 3 tablespoons Cocoa
  • 6 tablespoons Coca Cola
  • 1 box Confectioner’s Sugar
  • Optional: 1/2 to 1 cup Nuts (use your preference for type of nuts and how much)

How to make the Frosting

  1. In a saucepan, bring butter, cocoa, and Coca Cola to a boil.
  2. Stir in the sugar and mix well.
  3. Remove from heat and stir in the nuts.
  4. Spread over the cake while both are still warm.

You’ll want the Frosting to set before you serve it.  Once it does, dig in and enjoy!

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Posted in Baking With My Ancestors

Baking With My Ancestors – Irish Brown Bread

As I was making the list of all the baked goods I wanted to make for this new series, Irish Brown Bread was at the top.  It’s sooo good and sooo easy to make!  While I was in Ireland a few years ago, I ate Irish Brown Bread for breakfast every day.  It’s tasty with butter and jam, but even on it’s own, it’s yummy!

When people think of Ireland and bread, the mostly think of soda bread.  I’ll admit, I did too…until I tried the brown bread.  Irish Brown Bread became popular in 1840s when refined baking soda was introduced to the country.  The bread became ingrained in the every day lives of the people in Ireland and very important to the Irish culture!

After I got home from Ireland, the first thing on my list was to figure out how to make authentic Irish Brown Bread.  I found a few examples online, but I felt like they weren’t just right.  I found a bakery on Instagram, Kelly Lou Cakes (@kellyloucakes) and just happened to find her making the bread in her Insta-stories.  I went out on a limb and sent her a message asking her to share the recipe.  I wasn’t expecting anything in return, but to my surprise, she shared it!  So…below is Kelly Lou’s recipe for Irish Brown Bread…straight from Ireland!

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Irish Brown Bread Recipe

Ingredients

(note the measurements are in weight/European)

  • 700g Coarse Wholemeal Flour
  • 2 teaspoons Wheat Germ
  • 2 teaspoons Bran
  • 1 1/2 tsp Baking Soda
  • 1 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 800mL Buttermilk
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 tsp Oil

Steps

  1. Line 2 loaf pans with parchment paper.
  2. Preheat oven to 350F
  3. Mix the Flour, Germ, Bran, Baking Soda and Salt together.
  4. Add the Buttermilk and Eggs.  Stir to combine.
  5. Add the Oil and still until just combined.
  6. Pour the bread mixture into the two loaf pans
  7. Bake for 50 minutes or until bread is a golden brown.

That’s it!  When cooled, slice and enjoy it!  If you have any questions about the recipe, feel free to send me an email!

 

Posted in Revolutionary

Revolutionary – John Hanna

This is the first post in my Revolutionary series.  Each month, I’ll be highlighting different ancestors who either fought in the war or helped the cause.  It’s amazing when you start hearing all the different stories.  There are men, women, and even young adults who helped to make the United States exactly that, united.

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Today’s profile is John Hanna.  John is my 6th Great-Grandfather on my paternal side.  He was born in 1756 on his way to America from Ireland.  His parents, James A and Anne Johnson Hanna had six other children; Elizabeth, James W, William, David, Joseph, and Martha.  Once the family arrived, the settled in the Virginia colony.

John enlisted in the Continental Army in Greenbrier County, Virginia in 1777.  He joined as a private under Captains Samuel Lapsley and Alexander Breckenridge.  He saw quite a few battles including the Siege of Charleston (South Carolina) and the Battle of Monmouth.  If you’re a Hamilton fan, I’m sure you’re familiar with the Battle of Monmouth.  I’m looking at you, Charles Lee.

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At the Siege of Charleston, John was taken by the British Army as a prisoner of war.  He was held captive for about eighteen months.  Unfortunately, there are no records of where John was held or what the conditions were.  It seems that after his release, John was discharged from the Army.

After the war, John settled in Augusta County, West Virginia.  While living there, he met and married Jane Graham.  Jane and her family were also from Ireland.  If history teaches us anything, it seems more than likely that their families were from the same area of Ireland.  They married in 1787 and together had seven children; John, Robert Graham, Jane, Christopher, Joseph, Elizabeth, and Martha.

John and Jane eventually moved their family to Jackson County, Ohio.  The children would scatter to different states after that.  You have to think that John was proud of this fact.  He had fought for this country and the right for his children to explore it.  John Hanna passed away on April 11, 1845 at the age of 89.  I think it’s safe to say that John lived a long and eventful life!

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Posted in Weekend Update

Weekend Update (Weekday Version)

Hello Everybody!

I just wanted to give everyone an update on some exciting things coming this month in case you haven’t already heard!

Baking With My Ancestors

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This new monthly series will feature recipes from around the world as well as their significance to their particular culture. I’ll actually be baking these goodies and sharing the “how-to” so you can enjoy it at home!

The Unknown Heroes of the Revolutionary War

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This monthly series will feature some of the lesser-known folks who either fought in or supported the cause of the Patriots during the Revolutionary War.  I’ll be featuring both men and women (because women were awesome during this time in history!) and how they helped to shape the world we live in!

Summer DNA Basics Class

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In July, I’ll be teaching a class via IGTV or YouTube all about the basics of DNA testing.  I’ll be going over the why you should do it, the science behind it, and how DNA testing can make the world a better place!  Also, there will be a super special giveaway!

New Monthly Newsletter

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Make sure to sign up for the new monthly newsletter!  In the newsletter, you’ll get a sneak peak on upcoming blog features as well as tips & tricks for your own genealogy research.  I’ll also give you an update on what I’m currently researching and the tools I’m using to do so!