Posted in Genealogy 101

Who Do I Even Look For??

So you’ve been staring at your Ancestral Chart for a couple of weeks now and trying to figure out just who you picked to win the National Championship.  (Am I the only one who is reminded of March Madness every time I look at an Ancestral Chart?!)  If you are lucky, you’re still a little bit stressed out of who exactly to start your research with.  Do not be stressed because stress isn’t cool!  (Yeah, that pun was a bit of a reach.  Haha!)

Below are some ways to help you choose who to research and the first steps in doing so.

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Pick A Side

It’s never intentional, but usually we know more about one side of our family than the other.  Use this information to your advantage.  To get started, pick the side of your family that you know the most about.  Do you have the basic information for your Great Grandfather on your mother’s side?  You do…great!  Use that to get your feet wet.  Maybe you have the information but don’t have actual documentation.  Take what you know and start verifying the information with paper documentation.

  •  When you find documents, or any information, make sure to write down where you found it.  It’s also a good idea to get into the habit of writing down where you didn’t find information as this will make your research much easier.  I’ll go more in depth in citing sources in a later post.

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Don’t Be Afraid to Ask

Your best source of information will no doubt come from your older relatives.  These family members were either around when an event happened or heard the stories first hand from those who lived it.  Take advantage of this!  Take the time to interview your family members.  Write down their stories, or better yet, record them on your phone!  This will give you the opportunity to revisit the stories later to pick apart more information.

  • One thing to remember about family stories is that they are sometimes second hand information.  Someone told someone who told someone who is now telling you.  It can become a game of Telephone!  (I hope I’m not showing my age here! Haha!)  It’s important to verify everything you can with documentation or some type of reliable source.

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Cousins Are Your Friends

Now that you’ve decided on who you’re going to research, it’s important to remember their entire immediate family.  When I first started researching my family, I got into the very bad habit of only focusing on direct ancestors.  This means that I was only researching my grandfather, and his father, and his father, and well…you get the picture.  Not only was I missing out on learning about some fascinating cousins, I was also missing out on people who could potentially help me knock down brick walls.

  •  When you’re filling out your family tree, make sure to include all of your ancestor’s brothers and sisters (and their spouses).  Not only will this help you in your research, it will also help with DNA hits.  You are more likely to hit with a second or third cousin than you are with a direct ancestor.

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Now that you know how to get started and who to get started with, now we can get into specifics of where to get started!  Next week’s post will be a brief overview of different places to research and I’ll answer the question of if you really need to pay for the Ancestry account!

Posted in Genealogy 101

I Found A Twig…Now What…?!

The thought of jumping into your family history can be a bit intimidating.  With so many people and so much information to find, how in the world do you even get started?!  Well, let me help you out a bit.  I’ve come up with just a few suggestions to get you started!

  1. Start with what you know

You may only know your grandparents’ names, or you may be lucky enough to go all the way back to your 2x Great Grandparents.  Either way, you are at a great jumping off point.  The best way to get your feet wet in genealogy is to start with what you know.  My suggestion is to start by filling out a ancestral chart.  This sheet will help you to see the information you already have, and will help direct you in the direction of where to take your research.

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Ancestral Chart

I suggest starting with either your maternal or paternal side.  I find that usually a person knows more about one side than the other.  Do not ask me why this is the case!  Haha! Do not try to do both at the same time.  You will get confused on who goes with who and who was where. (That sentence alone sounds confusing!)  This isn’t just something for beginners to remember, but a good reminder for those of us who have been doing it for years!

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  1. Keep it simple

Okay, this kind of goes with what I said under number one, but let me go into a little more detail.  When I say simple what I mean is do not go in looking for every story about your ancestor.  Those will come with time.  To start, look for the basic vital records (birth, marriage, and death) and use these basics to grow your tree.  Birth certificates will usually tell you both parents’ names.  Marriage certificates will sometimes tell you who the couple’s parents are, and death certificates may tell you the spouse’s name as well as the parents’ names.

There is a lot more information you can gain from vital records, but I’ll go into more specifics in a later post.  Right now, you just want to get used to looking at the records.  One thing I failed to mention above is to pay attention to where these events occurred.  Be aware that of how people moved during the time you are researching.  If you’re in the early 1800s and a couple was married on the east coast and had a child nine months later on the west coast, you may need to do a little more digging.  That’s not to say that the scenario is impossible, but travel back then, especially across the country, was treacherous.  Could a couple, with a pregnant woman, really have made it across the county in that amount of time?

  1. Don’t be afraid to ask the dumb questions

I am a firm believer that there is no such thing as a dumb question, especially in genealogy.  While research may be done as a solo project, most genealogy is a collaborative effort.  That means, that someone out there may have the information that you need and vice versa.  If you are on Ancestry, and have completed the DNA testing, do not be afraid of reaching out to a new “cousin” that is researching the same family members that you are.  Ask them what information they have.  It’s always a smart idea to compare notes.  Sometimes you’ll hit a gold mine of information while other times you’ll come up with nothing.  You never know until you ask!

 

  1. Manage your expectations

I would love nothing more than to tell you that you will find what you’re looking for in exactly one week, but genealogy doesn’t work that way.  The best way to avoid getting frustrated is just to take it a bit at a time.  Celebrate when you find a new ancestor.  When you hit a brick wall, take a break.  It’s okay to step away for a moment.  Got get some wine…or a cupcake…believe me, I do it!

When doing genealogy, always remember the saying that it’s a marathon, not a sprint.  Genealogy is addicting, frustrating, but most importantly fun!

If you have any specific questions, feel free to email me coolgirlgenealogy@gmail.com

Ancestral chart can be downloaded at https://www.archives.gov/files/research/genealogy/charts-forms/ancestral-chart.pdf

Keep an eye out for a post in the coming weeks talking more specifically about vital records!